J. EISENHAUER WOODWORKS

Wood Working Journal by Jeremy Eisenhauer

Quick November - The Monthly Review

This November turned out to be my busiest months yet, despite the fact that at the beginning of the month, it was looking as dreary work wise as the weather itself. 

I worked on a number of items for an “accessories and lifestyle”  store called Litchfield in Vancouver’s historic Gastown. The store on Water St. is decked out in solid Black Walnut. My role was to make their cash desk and cabinet, handrails and a few other custom pieces (note the wall mounted hatchet/axe stand I designed after much mocking up). 


Also of note is a truck load of beautiful big slabs of wood, milled out of trees that have fallen around Vancouver, and milled into lumber on the beach near the west end of Vancouver. I had the good fortune of recieving some of this wood from a fellow who studied fine woodworking at the same school as myself. He mills the wood using an Alaskan chainsaw mill, and stores and dries the wood in the traditional method repopularized by James Krenov (2 years stickered and stacked outside, 1 year inside under stricked humidity and temperature scrutiny). Most modern lumber is dried using a particular type of kiln, which is thought by many to “kill” all the texture and natural colour of the wood. I feel very blessed to have received this wood, and it’s been a joy to work with so far. 

Working oak with hand planes.

Working oak with hand planes.

Hatchet display, made from Black Walnut.

Hatchet display, made from Black Walnut.

I am building a massive walnut table this week.

I am building a massive walnut table this week.

Old Pals. 

Matching bedside armoires in black walnut.

Old Pals.

Matching bedside armoires in black walnut.

New work! I have been very busy, and slowly working away at a pair of bedside armoires. They are nearly finished.

Black Walnut - Burnished finish.

This came in the mail today. So thrilled.

This came in the mail today. So thrilled.

Driftwood Joinery

Sometimes projects come that bring out a different skill set. Between working on the two matching bedside armoires in Black Walnut, I was asked by a close friend to build them an altar out of driftwood for their beach wedding in Roberts Creek, BC. I found I was calling on my time as carpenter building houses (and particularly building vaulted roof’s with hand cut rafters rather than trusses) to build this simple driftwood altar

Progress is noted by shavings. I am thoroughly enjoying the little universes of figure in this walnut.

Walnut VS. _____________

Over the last short while I have been working mostly with wood that has rogue grain patterns (Iroko, Doussie, Afromosia etc). It’s all beautiful stuff, but relatively hard to work with hand planes. Walnut however, is a simple, subtle, and generally ‘friendly’ (as JK would say) wood to work. 


I am beginning to realize that my time at IP made me a bit of a wood freak. I have visited a few shops lately and mostly what I see as the norm is big power tools with big noise, lots of dust and lots of disarray in the work space.  

In my little shop, I like to keep things as quiet, simple and organized as possible. I try to use methods that keep dust down, and shavings from hand planes a-plenty. 

Starting Anew

Today we begin a new venture with English Walnut. A set of bedside armoires.


These three works I built were installed at the new Briteweb office in Chinatown, Vancouver. www.britweb.com

Folks of the social networks. I bring you www.jeisenhauerwoodworks.com - my new website for my woodworking ventures. Please peruse and pass along.

Folks of the social networks. I bring you www.jeisenhauerwoodworks.com - my new website for my woodworking ventures. Please peruse and pass along.

My Krenovian smoothing plane is a work horse. Helps the grain graphics in this table top to showcase nicely.

Edge jointing Iroko with my handmade jointer plane.